Apr 14, 2013

Small finish and a final needle note

Good day everyone. Thank you again for the comments on your needle preference. Many of you never paid attention to size and type, you use what is comfortable and works for you. That to me is more important than following rules, as you all know. But after the bloody assault on my finger, I checked and found that the majority of my stash was composed of these little prickers, and I needed to find a solution.   Joanne made me realize something and directed me to her blog post here.  Secured needle threading.   Thank you so much Jo for pointing this out.  I have always threaded two floss ends into the eye to create the loop at the other end.  I don't like tails or having to start a stitch with any method other than slipping the needle through that loop on the backside for a secure and neat start.  Doing that drags the two pieces of floss that are in the eye, plus the 2 ends, so 4 threads are actually going through the linen and depending on the fabric, could really create floss fuzz.  I have been the victim of floss fuzz and could never figure out why it was no longer smooth.  Joanne's method pulls two strands through, and another advantage is the needle cannot slip off.  If you drop the project to run for chocolate or any other reason, the needle will stay attached - you can't lose it!  So I tried it while stitching this small, but ran into one downside.  I miss the correct placement many times and will slip the needle off and pull the stitch out, rethread, and continue.  With the secured needle method, you have to go back through the linen in the exact spot and try to remove the stitch.  I couldn't.  The needle had caught a wisp of the back threads and I was stuck.  I've gone back before to a prior stitch and it worked just fine, but this was three stitches back, so I had to cut the floss and start over. 
This is the small that I worked on.  I had completed the first one on 18th Century Rook, and this one is on unbleached.  I moved the design and colors a little.
Easy finish.
 
 
Interfacing on the backing fabric only, one layer of the thickest quilt batting (my absolute favorite stuffing),
 





 Liquid Stitch to glue it shut. 
 
 
 
 
 
 And a good squeeze to make sure the front isn't glued to the seam allowance.

My Pineberry Lane Wool designs are done!
I haven't decided on a sampler yet but it's narrowed down to three. 
I mentioned that I was going to the doc and would ask for a pill, and she obliged.  Unfortunately, it was an anti-depressant that also was to help with menopausal and anxiety issues.  I stopped it last night.  Haven't slept in days, crushing heartburn, my neck is unbearable.  After a little research, yes, a drug that works on your mood can wreak havoc on the body.  We have to be at the hospital at 6:30 am tomorrow so I'm hoping that resting today will put me back on track for an early start to a long day.
Have a great finish to your weekend - thanks for visiting.
Talk to you soon.
 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
 

18 comments:

Reyes "El telar de mi abuela" said...

Qué trabajos tan bonitos!!!
Te felicito.
Saludos desde Tenerife.

backporchcarver said...

Will be thinking of you tomorrow.Love the way you displayed your wool pillows.

Barb said...

I will definitely check Joanne 's advice. I thread the way you described that you used. Boy, it sounds like the cure was worse than the problem!! That has happened to me! Best of luck tomorrow morning.

Vickie said...

Yes, I have stitched that way before, but prefer the usual method.

I think your bowl is great!

WoolenSails said...

Those are wonderful pieces and I learned to do the tie off with the loop too. I have been taking cats claw for my lyme and I think it has a sleeping agent in it, I zonk right out now.

Debbie

Jo who can't think of a clever nickname said...

The solution to the reverse stitching problem is simple - gently pull the needle back through the fabric using the floss rather than trying to "unstitch" using the needle.

If you've got more than a couple of stitches to reverse stitch then just snip the thread at the eye of the needle, frog as usual then rethread the needle using the 2 strands as normal and restitch or secure the ends under the back of the stitching and cut off (if you don't like reusing frogged thread).

Primitive Stars said...

Hi Marly, love the sweet pillows, beautiful work.....Blessings Francine.

cucki said...

Wow so sweet xxx

Shirlee said...

The Pineberry Lanes look great! Best of luck tomorrow.

Ellen said...

Sweet pillows, love them!

Hugs,

Margaret said...

Love your pillows! I only stitch with one strand of thread, so the method you use doesn't work for me. Ah well.

Chocolates4Breakfast (TerriBoog) said...

Wonderful finish, Marly! I really like how you rearranged the pattern. The two look really sweet together'

Chocolates4Breakfast (TerriBoog) said...

Oops! Forgot to say good luck tomorrow!

Barbara Shores ~ Village Folk Art said...

Marly, I think your Pineberry Lane Wool designs compliment each other perfectly. Great job and displayed nicely too... Peace, Barb

butterfly said...

Lovely pillows, thanks again for the info, hugs.

Elisabetta said...

Wonderful I love so much this pattern and your finish is just perfect!

Karen said...

Hi Marly,
Love it!!!
Karen

Deb~Paxton Valley Folk Art said...

Thanks for the link to Joanne's post, I had never considered threading my needle in this way for cross stitch although since I make so many mistakes I think I would find the same problem as you encountered Marly. And I had never considered the fact that you are actually taking 4 strands through when you thread your needle in the traditional manner, food for thought! Love your finishes, the WOOL tucks are adorable. Sorry you had such a rotten reaction to your new medication, the side effects are so often worse than whatever it is you are trying to treat! Deb

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...