Aug 4, 2013

Turkey trot

Hello guys and dolls.  How's the weekend going?  Fast, huh?  Well so is summer and I'm not happy about that. 
When I was finishing the latest friend pillow, it dawned on me that (long ago) I wanted to try fringing a small piece like my Christmas pillow.  Remember this one?  The backing is the same linen, and the edges of both sides are included in the floss fringe.  My linen was a small piece and I stuck this in my bit of green dye jar (to remove the pinkish cast), shook it up for a minute or two, and came up with a new color.  No way I can do another piece and have it come out exactly the same.  But as I'm typing, I realize it doesn't have to match and could be completely different.  Hmm. 
 Anyway, if someone could direct me to a better way of squaring borderless stitchery for finishing, please pass it along.  Here's what I do - for those of you that cringe at my recklessness, skip this part.
I use a Sharpie pen to make a dot on the linen at the same distance from the last stitch on all four sides (further out than I plan on seaming).  Then I remove a linen thread at the dot to get a straight line for trimming, and cut the interfacing to the size I would like the finish to be.  In prior projects I needed to reposition the fusible because the linen was stretched a little off kilter.  Now, I keep the stitched side up with the fusible beneath and make sure the linen and design is straight, using the pressing cloth, fuse for a few seconds enough to hold it in place.  If all is well, then I turn it over and complete the fuse.  I sewed the backing along the edge of the fusible and then remembered the fringe.  Took it off - here we go.
After watching a few online videos (including Mary Corbet's Needle 'n Thread) for turkey stitch, I began.  Instead of using all the colors in the piece like the Christmas pillow, I chose to use one.  OK, I forgot.  Since you sew with all six strands, it's easier not having to separate anyway. 
 
I'm not happy with my work.  It's hard to go into the same hole that six threads already occupy with another stitch covering the front.  So they aren't as nice as my inspiration piece, but the second row which goes in front of this one may be better.  Do I really need the second row?  Could I use 3 or 4 strands to make it neater?  Of course.  Following rules is not my way, mainly because I can't remember them, but also because I have no patience.  And I'm a rebel.  The Jane Dean of stitching.
But what about the other fringe edge I did using the nun stitch.  Flimsy, but it's a finished edge to fringing.  If I choose a darker linen for the backing and fringe them both, it will be variegated but still flimsy.  So what?  I think the nun stitch is good looking and I can do it in the darker color.  So now what?  I think I'll finish the turkey and try the nun on another one.  Both are fairly easy to do, just time consuming.  If I would have just kept the backing on and went about my mess cleaning, I would have been done yesterday.
And for those interested, yes, you can reconstitute the dried beans for soups in the winter.  Search online and you'll find a few recipes and methods.  You can soak them overnight, or put them into simmering water, add a ham hock and other veggies. 
 
 
Bean watch - day three. 

This was kind of long wasn't it?  I thought I grabbed the decaf bag but maybe not.  My heart will let me know shortly.
Enjoy your day - stay safe - welcome to new followers!
Thanks for visiting!
 
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16 comments:

Vickie said...

Can't wait to see the finished piece. I think the turkey stitch is time consuming too, but really neat.

Carol said...

The Jane Dean of stitching--love it!! I've never tried the turkey stitch, but it looks great, Marly! For someone who claims she's not patient--it looks like you have to be to do this type of edging!

butterfly said...

What a great finish to use never thought of this one , I will try it soon.

Pondside said...

Finishing is always the challenge for me - which is why there is an entire basket of completed designs sitting on the shelf, all in need of backing, framing, fringing....

Pam in IL said...

I'm anxious to see your finish with the fringe.

Still not sure I would eat the beans after they had been hanging to dry...maybe that's just me though.

Chris said...

Wow! What a great finishing technique. I have done nun stitch finishing before but not the turkey stitch.
The green beans are looking good.

samplerlover said...

Hi Jane ooh I mean Marly lol, boy do I love your idea of doing turkey stitch around your smalls. What a wonderful idea. Looking forward to seeing this one finished. - Sandra.

Barb said...

Thanks so much for your finishing ideas!

Margaret said...

Love seeing the beans progress -- so cool! Are they hardening? Probably. Fringing -- hmmm. I don't know how you do it, but it looks good to me! I think it must be hard whatever method you use!

Rugs and Pugs said...

Love the fringe, Jane!
Hugs :)
Lauren

Simply Victoria said...

What great finishing techniques! Thanks for the pictures. Now I can see that my thinking was right with the removed strands for what you were explaining about Eliza.

Faye said...

Fringe it!!!!! It's perfect~~~~

Elisabetta said...

I love the original finish with fringe but also both patterns are great!!!

Ann Frank said...

So is it Marly Dean now? You crack me up - thanks for the Monday morning smile. I'm off to work on another t-shirt quilt. Made one for my niece and now daughter wants one. Nothing like waiting until the night before she leaves for college! Well, not really, but advance notice is a good thing. ~Ann

Cricket-bug Corner said...

Wow - cool finishing ideas. Never occured to me to stitch my own fringe!

Penny said...

I love your method of squaring a piece. Love both the turkey stitch and the nun stitch. And I agree, the summer is going by much too quickly. :)

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